Liar's Poker Summary at - WikiSummaries.

Liar's poker character analysis

A brilliant account—character-rich and darkly humorous—of how the U.S. economy was driven over the cliff. Truth really is stranger than fiction. Who better than the author of the signature bestseller Liar's Poker to explain how the event we were told was impossible—the free fall of the American economy—finally occurred; how the things that we wanted, like ridiculously easy money and.

Liar's poker character analysis

Liar’s Poker only suffers as a comparison to Michael Lewis’s best work, an unfair standard the younger writer could never have anticipated he’d set himself later. Taken on its own merits, it is still a fascinating, often very funny, difficult-to-put-down read, worth a look for readers with even a casual interest in the mysteries of Wall Street and the backstory of a bestselling writer.

Liar's poker character analysis

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Liar's poker character analysis

Liar's Poker is a non-fiction, semi-autobiographical book by Michael Lewis describing the author's experiences as a bond salesman on Wall Street during the late 1980s. (1) First published in 1989, it is considered one of the books that defined Wall Street during the 1980s, along with Bryan Burrough and John Helyar's Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco, and the fictional The Bonfire.

Liar's poker character analysis

Quicklet on Liar's Poker by Michael Lewis (CliffNotes-like Book Summary). analysis, and criticism from our expert writing team. In addition, our Quicklets include an overall summary, brief chapter summaries, a description of key characters and themes, fun trivia, and a selection of great online readings. Thanks! - - - - - Quicklets: Your Reading Sidekick! Never read a book alone again.

Liar's poker character analysis

Liar's Poker is one of those books one of your friends strongly urges you to read. A short little book, the recommendation I got from Bill Howe, my Canadian Intel colleague in Europe, was that it was a hilarious read. And so it was. It reads like Animal House. It is all, well mostly, a true.

Liar's poker character analysis

Evolution of FX Markets via Globalization of Capital. Authors; Authors and affiliations; Joseph L. McCauley; Conference paper. 458 Downloads; Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB) Abstract. This paper is about money, and why today’s foreign exchange (FX) markets are unstable. According to the literature (1), FX markets were.

Liar's poker character analysis

The Big Short Summary and Analysis of Part 1, Chapters 1-2. Buy Study Guide. Summary. Michael Lewis’ telling of this story draws on his personal experience on Wall Street. When he was only 24, he landed a job with Salomon Brothers, though he felt very unprepared for the position. He worked there for three years before leaving, partly out of a sense that his situation must be unsustainable.

Liar's poker character analysis

Here’s a book review of an oldie-but-goodie. Liar’s Poker by Michael Lewis is a non-fiction account of the author’s experiences as a 24-year old the 1980s who started working as a bond salesman for Salomon Brothers, one of the most powerful investment banks at the time (now folded into Citigroup). Half of the book is an insider’s view of the fast-paced and testosterone-driven world of.

Liar's poker character analysis

Liar’s Poker is the culmination of those heady, frenzied years—a behind-the-scenes look at a unique and turbulent time in American business. From the frat-boy camaraderie of the forty-first-floor trading room to the killer instinct that made ambitious young men gamble everything on a high-stakes game of bluffing and deception, here is Michael Lewis’s knowing and hilarious insider’s.

Liar's poker character analysis

You pokker an A. Plenty of people at Salomon Brothers made a hobby of brutally frank character analysis. The lady from Salomon fell silent at the end of my little speech. What I think Sutf reund had in mind in this Instance was a desire to show his courage, like the boy who leaps from the high dive. He was in his mid-forties and at the top of his profession. He drank pots of coffee and slept.